We shall not forget

Ardennes

The story of ‘The Class that Never Was’ now in four languages across Europe

This article was originally published by The Citadel Newsroom on November 6, 2014.

CHARLESTON, SC – In honor of the 70th Anniversary of The Citadel’s Class of 1944, known as “The Class that Never Was”, and in memory of the members of the classmates who served in or were killed in action in World War II, the college released a special video presentation in 2014 just before D-Day.

Citadel Cadets 1942

Cadets consider enlisting with the Navy, 1942

Now, that video, which includes rare film footage from campus in the 1940s, is being shown in four languages throughout Europe, thanks to the work of Roger Long who is a member of The Citadel Class of 1989, and members of The Citadel Memorial Europe Foundation. Long is president of the BENELUX Citadel Club, and founder and chairman of The Citadel Memorial Europe Foundation. He lives in Heythuysen, in the Dutch province of Limburg. He is originally from Raleigh, N.C.

“Members of The Citadel Memorial Europe Foundation volunteer in middle schools around the continent. The video about The Class that Never Was is the perfect teaching tool we needed to help honors and memorialize the Citadel men and their allies who died while in the service of their country here in Europe and in North Africa,” Long said.

Long worked with translators to establish subtitled copies of the video in DutchFrench and Italian, to complement the original version in English, enabling Europeans speaking those languages to view the video. (more…)


William Gadsen Daniels, ’42

Born on August 27, 1920, to Susan M. Daniels and George B. Daniels, William grew up in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. Throughout his four year study in Charleston, he held rank in the Corps of Cadets and was very active in extracurricular activities – Yacht Club, Episcopal Club, YMCA, and Calliopean Literary Society, to name a few. He was on the Regimental Staff his junior year with the rank of Technical Sergeant and was a member of the Junior Drill Platoon.

Cadet Captain William G. Daniels, Class of 1942
Source: 1942 Sphinx

His Senior year, with the rank of Cadet Captain, he commanded Cadet Company H. He was also the Yacht Club Commodore and a member of the Senior Drill Platoon. In 1942, William graduated from The Citadel with a bachelor’s degree in Political Science.

Later as a First Lieutenant in the US Army Air Corps, he served with the 551st (more…)


Honoring those who gave all

On Saturday, May 24, 2014, a Memorial Day ceremony was held at Ardennes American Cemetery and Memorial to honor and remember all Americans who have given their lives in the service of their country and its allies.

A volley of three rounds.

Taps.

Two Belgian F-16’s fly-over.

A windswept Field of Honor containing 5,323 American war dead of which 792 are unknowns.

 

Three Citadel Men rest in eternal peace at the cemetery which is located at Neupré, Belgium, approximately 18 kilometers south of the heart of Liège.

Frank Elmer Grogan, Jr., Class of 1942

Jerome Chris Serros, Class of 1942

James William Hendon, Jr. Class of 1942

/RL


One Year of The Citadel Memorial Europe

WE REMEMBER…

One year ago, I published I wear the ring and publicly announced the availability of this digital memorial to the Citadel Men interred and memorialized here in 16 military cemeteries across Europe and North Africa.

It has been a year of vibrant impressions and one of the most spiritually and emotionally enriching years of my life. As I have tried to get to know these men and to share their stories, I have had the pleasure of making many new friends, and reconnecting with old friends, here in Europe and in America. So many warm and incredible people have touched my life this year. For this, I am truly grateful.

I have compiled my Top Ten Memories. Here is our story as I experienced it the past 12 months…

– Into Thy Hands O Lord –

1 Visit to Cambridge with BillA few days after “going public”, I received an email from an alumnus. A few weeks later, I flew over the North Sea to visit Cambridge American Cemetery in England with him, two of his sons, and the historian of “The Bloody 100th”. It was an inspirational and moving experience that I shall never forget. Together, we paid our respects to the three Citadel Men resting in peace and the one memorialized on the Wall of the Missing. Together, we recited The Cadet Prayer.

On that day, I began a new phase in this journey. See my post The Major of St. Lo.

– Memorial Day –

During Memorial Day weekend, I visited the Citadel Men resting in peace at the Netherlands and Henri-Chapelle American Cemeteries. The two cemeteries are located just 20 kilometers from each other, one on either side of the Dutch-Belgian border to the east of Maastricht and Liege in the direction of Aachen, Germany.

An alumnus wrote to me several times during April and May, “Don’t forget those who are still Missing-In-Action!”. In remembrance of the eight men who rest in no known grave here in Europe and North Africa, I laid flowers at the grave of an unknown a few meters from Albert S. Hagood, Class of 1931. They are not forgotten.

Two posts – Part I and Part II – describe the events of that spectacular Memorial Day weekend.

Memorial Day - Copy

– Faces and Stories –

Since last April, I have received details about our men from many places – alumni, family, their “adopters”, historians, and archivists. Four men have received the attention of several posts. Their names, faces, and stories have become familiar. (more…)