We shall not forget

Henri-Chapelle

Edwin Browning Moore, Class of 1944

E.B. Moore was born on September 19, 1923 in Manila, Philippine Islands. His father, William C. Moore, Class of 1915, was a career Army officer, and the family moved many times in Edwin’s early years. Records show a few of their many residences included Gainesville, FL (1930), where his father was a military instructor at the University of Florida; Fort Davis, Panama Canal (1935); and Charleston, SC, (1938-1940 where his father was a military instructor at The Citadel. Edwin’s parents were married in 1918 in Columbus, Georgia. His mother, Dorothy Rodgers Moore, was from Charleston.

1943-sphinx-moore-eb-44Cadet Sergeant Edwin Browning Moore, Class of 1944

Edwin’s father, Maj. William Cheney Moore, USA, was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel while at The Citadel. He was an Associate Professor of Military Science and Tactics and headed the Infantry Unit during the 1939-40 academic year. Working with him were two of his Citadel classmates, Maj. Robert Kirk, USA, and Maj. Roy Hilton. The 1940 Sphinx recorded, “Because they are alumni of The Citadel, they are able to assist cadets in coping with the various problems (more…)


Thomas Franklin Woodhead, Class of 1946

Thomas Franklin Woodhead was born on November 20, 1924 to Gertrude Easterly Woodhead and William Winters Woodhead of Chattanooga, Tennessee. The senior Woodhead had served in the Army during WWI, and, prior to the Great War, had been a bank clerk at the USA ROT Camp, Ft. Oglethorpe, GA.

Thomas grew up in Hamilton County, Tennessee. He graduated in 1942 from the Baylor School, a military college preparatory school for boys overlooking the Tennessee River at Chattanooga and attended summer school at the University of Tennessee Chattanooga prior to reporting to The Citadel with the Class of 1946. During his year as a member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, he was a Private in M Company.

woodhead-1946-sphinx-1943-p162-croppedCadet Thomas Franklin Woodhead, Class of 1946
November 20, 1924 – December 10, 1944
Source: The 1943 Sphinx, p. 162.

He enlisted on June 13, 1943 and received his training at Camps Barkley and Walters in Texas. He sailed overseas on June 5, 1944 on a troopship loaded with replacement personnel. Once he reached the European Theater of Operations, he was assigned to Company “F”, 2nd Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Division, First U.S. Army. (more…)


Waverly Owen Skidmore, Class of 1946

Owen Skidmore was born on September 24, 1923, to Mattie Owen and Lloyd J. Skidmore of Albemarle, North Carolina. After graduating from Albemarle High School in June, 1942, he entered The Citadel with the Class of 1946 at the beginning of the academic year 1942-43. In the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, he was a member of Cadet Company K during this Freshman, and only, year at The Citadel. At the end of the first semester, he registered for the draft. His draft card, completed December 24, 1942, listed him as 5’7”, 132 lbs, brown hair and eyes, with a “ruddy” complexion. He would be inducted into the Army at Fort Bragg, N.C., on August 12, 1943.
Waverly O Skidmore 1946

Private Owen Skidmore wrote his parents, in a letter they received August 2, 1944, that he was wounded on July 26, receiving chest and head wounds, and was (more…)


Joseph Gibbs Ferrel, Class of 1946

Born on October 26, 1924, in Kern County, California to Linnie Rebecca Gibbs Ferrel and Clarence John Ferrel, Joseph graduated from Bakersfield High School in 1942 and then entered The Citadel with the Class of 1946 at the start of the 1942-43 academic year. While there, he was a member of Cadet Company P. He was called away mid-way through his freshman year, enlisting in December 1942 and entering the U.S. Army on March 27, 1943 at Fort Macauthur, San Pedro, Los Angeles, California.

Cadet Private Joseph Gibbs Ferrel, Class of 1946 
Source: 1943 Sphinx

A Private First Class, he was sent to Europe in August 1944 with Company K, 414th Infantry Regiment, 104th Division.  The regiment landed at (more…)


Joseph Barre Traywick, Class of 1931

Born on August 31, 1910, to Mrs. Janie Crute Traywick and Dr. A.P. Traywick, Joseph was a native of Cameron, South Carolina. He attended The Citadel and was graduated from the Medical College of South Carolina in Charleston. While at The Citadel, he majored in Chemistry and was a Cadet Private in Cadet Companies F and D his freshman and junior years respectively.

Joseph Barre Traywick Sphinx 1930Cadet Private Joseph Barre Traywick
Class of 1931

In the summer of 1930, Cadet Traywick spent six weeks studying at the Chemical Warfare Training Camp at Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland, and upon completion was commissioned a second lieutenant, officer reserve corps, chemical warfare service.

He served his medical internship at Roper hospital in Charleston. Dr. Traywick was resident physician for the Santee-Cooper project at (more…)


Robert Alexander Bates, Class of 1945

Robert Bates was a native of Park Ridge, Illinois, born on September 9, 1923 to Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Bates. In 1941, he graduated from Maine High School and entered The Citadel at the beginning of the academic year 1941-1942. During his studies in Charleston, he was a member of Cadet Company C .[1][2][3]

Robert Alexander Bates

In July 1943, after completing his sophomore year, he enlisted in the U.S. Army.  He received his training in California and Colorado before reporting for duty overseas. In Europe, he served with the Military Police (MP) Platoon, Headquarters Company, (more…)


More than a name in marble

Originally written and published in Dutch in the Limburg’s local newspaper on March 26, 2015.
Link naar artikel in het nederlands. Translation by W. Kiggen and M. Heemels.


AT THE NEIGHBORS [1]
The Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery was yesterday dominated by the Citadel Men. Guys who were plucked from the school to fight in World War II.

by Stefan Gillissen

US military training is best known for the big screen. Movies paint a gruesome picture of the first weeks in the service of Uncle Sam, with Full Metal Jacket and Jarhead as stand outs. Breaking the will, the decompensation of the mind, creates the perfect fighting machine. It is not necessarily an incorrect observation, but one without qualification. Training is needed to forge a unit that follows commands in wartime.

Citadel Cadet plays Amazing Grace at Henri-Chapelle American CemeteryA Citadel cadet plays for the fallen men. Photo Arnaud Nilwik

But not only in the army do candidates undergo Bootcamp or what is called Hell Week. Also at American military academies, cadets are subject to a heavy introduction. From there, at least 40 percent of the men and women will go into active military service in 2015, and they are a showcase for the country. Formed by brutal workout, driven by honor and love. (more…)