We shall not forget

The Citadel

LIFE AT THE CITADEL

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, May 31, 1942, p.43


This is another in a series of articles on Life on the Campus at our leading schools and colleges. By ELEANOR NANGLE

FOR THE last week more than 200 first classmen at the Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina at Charleston, have been approaching, with a reluctance they wouldn’t have believed possible four years ago, the most eagerly anticipated event of their lives. As seniors they have led the corps for the last time. They have formed in the reviewing stand to receive the last parade. Yesterday they were graduated.

Today they are scattering to their homes in all parts of the country, most of them pausing only briefly before they enter the armed services. But something of them remains at the Citadel, adding in large or small measure to the vast stores of cadet tales and traditions there. And the spirit of the Citadel goes with them. In the life of all Citadel men the thread of Citadel memories is one of the most colorful, durable, and treasured in its whole tapestry.

Full-dress parade in the Spring of 1943 (Courtesy of The Citadel Archives)

The Citadel man has absorbed more than rigorous training of mind, body, and spirit, and when he reviews them, as all graduating cadets do on commencement day, he places new value on other gifts of the school to the student – the Spartan discipline, the good counsel, the friendships, the democracy, the pageantry of patriotism and the essence of it. (more…)


Mysterieuze verbintenis maakt een Nederlandse Citadel-Cadet trots tijdens de Amerikaanse Veteransday en ver daarna

The Citadel Newsroom, November 11, 2016. Read the English version:
Uncanny connection brings pride for cadet from Holland on Veterans Day and beyond


De Nederlandse middelbare scholier en fervent basketbalspeler Tom Koopman kreeg een telefoontje van een Amerikaanse sportscout, behorende tot de Amerikaanse militaire academie “The Citadel”, gelegen in Charleston, South Carolina. De scout bood hem een volledige studiebeurs aan in de V.S. als Tom zou besluiten daar te komen basketballen.  Koopman had nog nooit gehoord van deze school maar desondanks accepteerde hij het aanbod en startte als eerstejaars aan The Citadel in augustus 2013. Met deze start begon ook het spelen voor het basketbalteam van de school, The Bulldogs. De 203 cm lange Tom zit nu in zijn afstudeerjaar, is een succesvolle cadet en leider van het team.

At The Citadel in Charleston, S.C., on October, 2016. Zach Bland/The CitadelCadet Tom Koopman en zijn vader tijdens de ringen-ceremonie in oktober 2016

“Dit was het begin van iets unieks. Ik begreep van de aannamecommissie dat The Citadel een militaire school was, maar totdat je het hier echt zelf ervaart, is het moeilijk te begrijpen hoe speciaal deze plek eigenlijk is” aldus koopman. “Het was best zwaar aan het begin, maar wanneer je jezelf als cadet ontwikkelt, begin je het grotere plaatje te zien en begrijp je de waarde van een plekje in het South Carolina Kadettenkorps.”

Koopman ontving zijn felbegeerde Citadelring in oktober tijdens het ouderweekend. Zijn vader Patrick vloog naar Charleston vanuit zijn woonplaats Baarlo om de bijzondere prestatie van zijn zoon mee te kunnen vieren. Maar voordat vader en zoon gezamenlijk door de symbolische grote gouden ring zouden lopen, hadden ze samen al iets bijzonders in handen dat hun familie al decennia eerder aan de school verbond.

“Toen ik dit ontdekte kreeg ik er kippenvel van” aldus Roger Long, voorzitter van The Citadel Memorial Europe Foundation (more…)


Army ROTC at The Citadel celebrates 100 years

citadel coastal artillery cadets drilling circa 1923Citadel Coastal Artillery Corps ROTC cadets with 8 inch Howitzer M1918 MkVIII, circa 1923


Originally published by The Citadel, October 20, 2016, on thedigitel.com


The Citadel marks its Army ROTC Centennial on Oct.  21, 2016

By Maj. Steve Smith, TAC officer and Citadel historian

The Citadel applied to the U.S. Department of War in 1882, requesting that an Army officer be assigned to the college as Professor of Military Science and Tactics. That application laid the groundwork for what would eventually become an Army ROTC program at the college. (Photo: Citadel CAC ROTC cadets drilling Howitzer M1918 MkVIII, circa 1923)

In the coming years, The Citadel was classified as an Essentially Military College — meaning students were housed in barracks, constantly in uniform, and bound to a disciplinary system. As a result, the war department’s college division inspected The Citadel annually from 1904-27, during which time the college earned the distinguished college title 20 times until the program was suspended. In 1916 and 1917, the designation allowed The Citadel to recommend (more…)


The Citadel Museum Reopens

Daniel Library Director, David Goble, ’69, talks about the much anticipated re-opening of The Citadel Museum, which represents the history of The Citadel from it’s founding in 1842 to the present. This exhibit explores the long history of the school by showcasing some of our past and present uniforms displayed along a timeline. A display of The Citadel rings from 1895 to the present is also a focal point of the museum.


Look for other topical displays throughout the Daniel Library. Through a self guided tour, the visitor experiences the essence of each era in The Citadel’s history. (more…)


Pat Conroy, the Lowcountry’s Prince of Tides, passes away

Excerpts from the like titled article written by Brian Hicks and published by Post & Courier, Charleston, South Carolina, March 4, 2016. FULL ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE


Pat Conroy, the best-selling novelist and proud adoptive son of the Lowcountry who wrote lyrically about Charleston and unflinchingly about The Citadel, died Friday. He was 70.

Pat Conroy - Citadel AthleticsCadet Pat Conroy, Class of 1967
Source: The Citadel Athletics

The author of “The Great Santini,” “The Lords of Discipline” and “The Prince of Tides” and eight other books passed away shortly after being diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer that had gone undetected. He died at 7:43 p.m., surrounded by loved ones and family.

The Citadel mourned his passing Friday night.

“This is a very sad day for The Citadel family. Pat Conroy was a world-renowned author, active in his community and a passionate alumnus of The Citadel. He will be missed,” Lt. Gen. John Rosa, Citadel President said.

He wore The Ring (more…)


Aankondiging van het zeventigjarig jubileum van “De klas die nooit bestond”

Een herinnering vanwege Memorial Day en de zeventigste herdenking van D-Day: zeldzame filmbeelden uit de Citadelarchieven en het verhaal van de “Klas van 1944” die bekend werd als de “Klas die nooit bestond” vanwege haar voortijdige inzet tijdens de Tweede Wereldoorlog.


Charleston, S.C. (PRWEB) May 27, 2014 (View original here)

Fysieke trainingen, exercities en inspecties. Oude rekruteringsbeelden uit 1942 laten beelden zien uit het dagelijkse leven van de kadetten uit het “South Carolina Korps”. De filmbeelden van “The Citadel” werden vertoond op scholen en in theaters om de waarde van een militaire opleiding aan te tonen op het moment dat Amerika zich mengde in de Tweede Wereldoorlog. Maar de kadetten die ten tijde van de filmopnames tweedejaars student waren, konden hun opleiding niet afmaken. Hun opleiding werd op dramatische wijze onderbroken.

‘Zo wordt de klas terecht genoemd omdat er voor ons geen diploma-uitreiking was, geen ceremonie met de afstudeerring en wij nooit de privileges zouden ervaren van de ouderejaars studenten aan De Citadel. Uiteindelijk vind ik de naam “de klas die nooit bestond” dus heel toepasselijk,’ zegt Timothy Street, lid van de “Klas van 1944”.

Als eerbetoon aan de “Klas van 1944” en de leden van de klas die dienden in of sneuvelden tijdens de Tweede Wereldoorlog heeft De Citadel een film gemaakt met zeldzame beelden, (more…)


The Class That Never Was

This story was originally published in the Sandlapper, Autumn 2009. It is posted here in its entirety with the permission of the author.


The 1940 plebes prematurely were carried off by a small diversion known as “World War II.”

At mess one day in 1943, The Citadel Class of ’44 were ordered to stand up. They heard the words: “Gentlemen, you are shipping out.”


By Sheila Collins Ingle

Sam Piper

“A place for everything, and everything in its place”—one of many Citadel standards. (Courtesy of Sheila Collins Ingle)

In 1940, World War II enveloped Europe. Belgium, Norway and France surrendered to the German Army. Italy, siding with Germany, declared war on Britain and France in June. Hitler’s parade into Paris was broadcast in American theaters on Fox Movie-tone News. Air battles and daylight raids between the Luftwafte and the Royal Air Force over Britain’s skies began in August. Men, women and children were dying.

That same year in America, Big Band sounds filled the air waves and dance floors. Crooner Bing Crosby and comedian Bob Hope made their first movie together. Everyone flocked to laugh at My Favorite Wife and The Philadelphia Story. (Our Office of War declared movies essential for morale and propaganda.) But in May, the country listened to President Franklin D. Roosevelt give a “Fireside Chat” on National Defense. He looked backward and forward at the situation in Europe and its future
effect on America.

World War II was winding closer to home shores.

On September 2, 1940, 565 high school graduates reported to The Citadel in Charleston for their freshmen year of college. They came from across the United States. Each enthe same wrought iron gate. Young men arrived from California, Indiana, Pennsylvania . . . but most were South Carolinians. Registration began at 9 a.m. in the armory with forms to fill out and fees to pay. Freshman expenses were $531.50 for first-year South Carolina cadets, $671.50 for out-of-state cadets. Gen. Charles Pelot Summerall, Citadel president, welcomed the class that night. (more…)