We shall not forget

Posts tagged “1st Infantry Division

Spring Break: Over There

by Steven V. Smith, ’84 – Chair, CAA History Committee

This article originally appeared in the Alumni News of The Citadel – Summer 2017. It is published here in its entirety with the permission of the Citadel Alumni Association. Photos have been added to this web post which did not appear in the original print version.

Cadets enrolled in Professor Kyle Sinisi’s class, History 391: The U.S. in World War I, spent their days of Spring break walking the American Expeditionary Force battlefields in France. Accompanying the class were Board of Visitors member, Col. Myron Harrington, USMC, Ret., ’61, and the director of Daniel Library, Lt. Col. David Goble, SCM, ’69. The group was also fortunate to have Matthew Davenport, critically acclaimed author of First Over There: The Attack on Cantigny, America’s First Battle of World War I, accompany them.

Citadel Cadets at the famous Bulldog Fountain near the village of Belleau.

In the village of Cantigny, they walked the terrain of America’s first combined arms attack as Davenport described the action where in the early morning of May 28, 1918, the 3,500 soldiers of the 1st Division climbed out of their trenches to (more…)


LIFE AT THE CITADEL

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, May 31, 1942, p.43


This is another in a series of articles on Life on the Campus at our leading schools and colleges. By ELEANOR NANGLE

FOR THE last week more than 200 first classmen at the Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina at Charleston, have been approaching, with a reluctance they wouldn’t have believed possible four years ago, the most eagerly anticipated event of their lives. As seniors they have led the corps for the last time. They have formed in the reviewing stand to receive the last parade. Yesterday they were graduated.

Today they are scattering to their homes in all parts of the country, most of them pausing only briefly before they enter the armed services. But something of them remains at the Citadel, adding in large or small measure to the vast stores of cadet tales and traditions there. And the spirit of the Citadel goes with them. In the life of all Citadel men the thread of Citadel memories is one of the most colorful, durable, and treasured in its whole tapestry.

Full-dress parade in the Spring of 1943 (Courtesy of The Citadel Archives)

The Citadel man has absorbed more than rigorous training of mind, body, and spirit, and when he reviews them, as all graduating cadets do on commencement day, he places new value on other gifts of the school to the student – the Spartan discipline, the good counsel, the friendships, the democracy, the pageantry of patriotism and the essence of it. (more…)


Capt. Holmes Dies in France

Originally published in The News & Courier, Charleston, South Carolina, Sunday, July 28, 1918.


Charleston was much saddened yesterday to learn through The News and Courier of the death in France of Capt. James H. Holmes, Jr., of Charleston, and Capt. Julius A. Mood of Summerton. Capt. Holmes’ wife and little baby, whom he has never seen, are in Hendersonville, N.C., with his parents. His widow was Miss Adela Follin, of Charleston.

James Hill Holmes, Class of 1915JAMES HILL HOLMES, JR.
CLASS OF 1915
October 9, 1895 – July 19, 1918

Capt. Holmes graduated at the Citadel in the class of 1915, with the rank of senior cadet captain, the highest attainable in that splendid battalion, long recognized by the War Department as one of the most (more…)


LIEUT. JOHN H. DAVID KILLED IN FRANCE

The Dillon Herald, Dillon, South Carolina, March 14, 1918, Vol. 22, No. 18


The First to Volunteer for Foreign Service

His Death Brings Sorrow to Hundreds of Friends in State and County

Lieut. John H. David, [The Citadel Class of 1914] fighting in France, was killed in action March 1st. This announcement will bring genuine sorrow to scores of Lieut. David’s friends throughout the county and state.

J. H. David, Jr. -1Cadet Second Lieutenant John Hodges David, Jr., Class of 1914. From the 1914 Sphinx.
Photograph likely taken by Capt. Louis Knox, The Citadel.

The details of Lieut. David’s death were not given. His father Dr. J. H. David, received a telegram from the war department Monday night at 7 o’clock announcing that Lieut. David (more…)


FIRST CITADEL MAN LAYS DOWN HIS LIFE

The News and Courier
Charleston, South Carolina
March 13, 1918 [1]

Lieut. J. H. David of Class of 1914 Killed in Action on the French Front

WAS A NATIVE OF DILLON

All Business Suspended in That Town Yesterday and the Schools Closed

First Lieut. John Hodges David, Jr., whose name appeared in the overseas casualty list yesterday morning as having been killed in action on March 1, is the first South Carolina officer to lay down his life during the present war, and is the first Citadel graduate killed in action since the entrance of the United States into the struggle.

Lieut. David hails from Dillon, and was graduated from the Citadel in the class of 1914, being especially commended for efficiency in military tactics. He was commissioned as a first lieutenant following his graduation from the first Oglethorpe training camp, and volunteered for overseas service.

1914-david-u20110118___resize02

Cadet John Hodges David, Jr., Class of 1914 [2]

Business Houses Closed.

All business houses in Dillon were closed yesterday between noon and 8 o’clock in respect to his memory, and the city schools observed a holiday. News of the young officer’s death was received by his parents Monday night, and has cast a damper of gloom over the entire town, where he was universally liked and admired.

No details of Lieut. David’s death have been made public, only the bare announcement he had been killed in action. As a squad of twenty-seven were totally obliterated in addition to the officer, it is presumed that he was in charge of a patrol or raiding party that unexpectedly clashed with a Hun patrol in No Man’s Land. (more…)