We shall not forget

Posts tagged “ABMC

The story of ‘The Class that Never Was’ now in four languages across Europe

This article was originally published by The Citadel Newsroom on November 6, 2014.

CHARLESTON, SC – In honor of the 70th Anniversary of The Citadel’s Class of 1944, known as “The Class that Never Was”, and in memory of the members of the classmates who served in or were killed in action in World War II, the college released a special video presentation in 2014 just before D-Day.

Citadel Cadets 1942

Cadets consider enlisting with the Navy, 1942

Now, that video, which includes rare film footage from campus in the 1940s, is being shown in four languages throughout Europe, thanks to the work of Roger Long who is a member of The Citadel Class of 1989, and members of The Citadel Memorial Europe Foundation. Long is president of the BENELUX Citadel Club, and founder and chairman of The Citadel Memorial Europe Foundation. He lives in Heythuysen, in the Dutch province of Limburg. He is originally from Raleigh, N.C.

“Members of The Citadel Memorial Europe Foundation volunteer in middle schools around the continent. The video about The Class that Never Was is the perfect teaching tool we needed to help honors and memorialize the Citadel men and their allies who died while in the service of their country here in Europe and in North Africa,” Long said.

Long worked with translators to establish subtitled copies of the video in DutchFrench and Italian, to complement the original version in English, enabling Europeans speaking those languages to view the video. (more…)


ABMCeducation.org is live!

Washington D.C. – National History Day (NHD), the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC), and the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University are launching a new, free digital resource today in honor of Veterans Day: ABMCeducation.org. This website includes 21 lesson plans created by American teachers who took the trip of a lifetime this summer to discover the stories of World War II fallen heroes buried and memorialized overseas as part of the Understanding Sacrifice education program.

Help spread the word by sharing this video on social media with the hashtag #TeachABMC.


Participating teachers designed lesson plans specific to their teaching discipline. These lesson plans are hosted at ABMCeducation.org and are designed to increase students’ understanding of sacrifices made in WWII.  Designed for middle school and high school classrooms, the lesson plans are multi-disciplinary and can be applied in history, as well as art, math, science and English classrooms.  Through the use of primary and secondary sources, videos, and hands-on activities, students are transported to the war front and home front. From role-playing difficult family decisions at home to designing new war memorials and exploring military tactics utilized in France, students will walk away with a vivid understanding of the high cost paid by all Americans during this war.

Discover history through the stories of fallen heroes!

Contact:
National History Day | (301) 314-9739 | info@nhd.org | NHD.org


Note: One of the program’s participating teachers, Mr. Pren Woods, of Alston Middle School, Summerville, South Carolina, researched Richard Paul Padgett, Class of 1944, one of the 22 Fallen Heroes whose story is told on this new ABMCeducation.org site. If you are a history teacher covering WWII, this is a must-see (and use) website. Please check this out and spread the word. /RL


RICHARD PAUL PADGETT, Class of 1944

On April 30, 1945, 2Lt. Richard “Paul” Padgett, ’44, native of Walterboro, South Carolina, was killed in action in the vicinity of Tirschenreuth, Germany near the Czech border. Born to Mr. and Mrs. C. Gadsen Padgett on February 16, 1923, Paul was a standout student leader at both Walterboro High School and The Citadel.


A member of The Citadel’s Class of 1944, he was 4th Battalion Ordnance Sergeant his junior year. He was a member of the Bond Volunteers and a member of the Sphinx, Ring, and Standing Hop Committees. Indicative of his standing among the Corps of Cadets, Paul was chosen by Gen. Summerall to be the (more…)


Meer dan een naam in marmer

Originally written and published in Dutch in the local Limburg’s newspaper on March 26, 2015.
Click here for an English translated version.


BIJ DE BUREN
De Amerikaanse begraafplaats Henri-Chapelle stond gisteren in het teken van de Citadel Men. Jongens die uit de schoolbanken zijn geplukt om tijdens de Tweede Wereldoorlog te vechten.


door Stefan Gillissen

Amerikaanse militaire training is vooral bekend van het grote scherm. Films schetsen een gruwelijk beeld van de eerste weken in dienst van Uncle Sam, met Full Metal Jacket en Jarhead als uitschieters. Het breken van de wil, het decompenseren van de geest, creëert de ideale vechtmachine. Het is niet per se een onjuiste observatie, maar wel één zonder enige nuance. De opleiding is nodig om een eenheid te smeden die in oorlogstijd bevelen opvolgt.

Citadel Cadet plays Amazing Grace at Henri-Chapelle American CemeteryEen doedelzakspeler speelt voor de gevallen mannen. foto Arnaud Nilwik

Maar niet alleen in het leger ondergaan kandidaten wat Boot Camp of Hell Week wordt genoemd. Ook op Amerikaanse militaire academiën worden cadetten onderworpen aan een zware introductie. Minstens 40 procent van de mannen en vrouwen gaat anno 2015 in actieve militaire dienst en wordt een uithangbord voor het vaderland. Gevormd door brute training, gedreven door eergevoel en liefde. (more…)


En annonçant le 70e anniversaire de la classe qui n’a jamais existé

Un  70e anniversaire souvenir du Memorial Day et  du jour J : extraits de films inédits des archives de la Citadelle et l’histoire derrière la classe du collège de 1944 qui est devenue connue sous le nom de la classe qui n’a jamais éxisté en raison de leur service dans la Seconde Guerre mondiale.


Charleston, S.C. (PRWEB) May 27, 2014 (View original here)

L’entraînement physique, des exercices, des inspections …  recensement defilms de 1942 qui représentent des scènes de la vie dans le Corps des cadets SC. Les films de la Citadelle ont été une fois joués dans les écoles et les théâtres pour promouvoir la valeur d’une éducation d’une école militaire ainsi que de l’Amérique  qui a été entièrement engagée dans la Seconde Guerre mondiale et deux ans  avant le jour J. Mais les cadets qui étaient  étudiants en deuxième année  à l’époque du tournage étaient sur ​​le point d’avoir leur parcours scolaire  interrompu de façon dramatique.

Citadel Cadets 1942Cadets compte enrôler dans la Marine, 1942

“C’est vrai parce qu’on n’a jamais eu de diplômes , on n’a jamais eu  de cérémonies,et on n’a jamais eu une quelconque particularité  propre à un ancien de La Citadelle – un des privilèges qui appartient à un ancien de la Citadelle. Donc, par conséquent, (more…)


He Served: Henry Garlington, ’45

Published in August, 2012, this article originally appeared in “The Skinnie“, Skidaway Island’s local magazine (Savannah, Georgia). It is posted here in its entirety with the permission of “The Skinnie”.

Henry F. Garlington, WWII P-40 pilot

by Ron Lauretti

Henry Garlington’s story is amazing. it’s about a daredevil World War II fighter pilot, but it’s also the chronicle of a family tree full of fighting men, one who rode with General Custer (of Little Bighorn fame) and another who sailed with Commo. Perry (the commodore who opened Japan to the West).

In this story, Garlington is the aforementioned fighter pilot and a long-time Savannah resident. He moved to The Marshes of Skidaway Island several months ago. His memories include combat sorties and captivity, when he was imprisoned by the Germans after they shot him down over Italy.

But first, more on Garlington’s kin who preceded him in service to the United States… (more…)


The 70th Anniversary of The Class that Never Was

A Memorial Day and D-Day 70th anniversary remembrance: Rare film footage from The Citadel archives and the story behind the college’s Class of 1944 that became known as The Class that Never Was because of their service in WWII.

Charleston, S.C. (PRWEB) May 27, 2014 (View original here)

Physical training, drills, inspections…old recruiting films from 1942 depict scenes of life in the S.C. Corps of Cadets. The Citadel’s films were once played at schools and theaters to promote the value of a military college education just as America was fully engaging in World War II and two years before D-Day. But cadets who were sophomores at the time of the filming were about to have their college careers interrupted in dramatic fashion.Citadel Cadets 1942

Cadets considering enlisting in the Navy, 1942

“It’s the truth because we never had graduations, we never had ring ceremonies, and we never had any of the particulars that go with being a senior at The Citadel − any of the privileges that go with being a senior at The Citadel. So as a result I don’t think the label of The Class That Never Was is all together inaccurate,” said Timothy Street, member of The Citadel Class of 1944.

In honor of The Citadel’s Class of 1944 and the members of the class who served in or were killed in action in World War II, the college released rare film footage in conjunction with a video describing (more…)


I loved it because of you

By Clemson Turregano, ’83

MARGRATEN, Holland.

Citadel friends and Army friends,

I have to say that the Dutch got it right. Best.Memorial.Day.Ever.

Memorial Day wreaths

How do you honor the fallen on Memorial Day? First, find Roger Long (Cid 89), the most knowledgeable American about Citadel WWII fallen in Europe. Meet him at a cafe near the cemetery. Meet the wonderful Dutch people who have ‘adopted’ the graves of the Citadel war dead. They make sure these fallen heroes are remembered with flowers, visits, and memories.

Meet two young history teachers, both wearing Citadel buttons, who are familiar with the history of (more…)


Honoring those who gave all

On Saturday, May 24, 2014, a Memorial Day ceremony was held at Ardennes American Cemetery and Memorial to honor and remember all Americans who have given their lives in the service of their country and its allies.

A volley of three rounds.

Taps.

Two Belgian F-16’s fly-over.

A windswept Field of Honor containing 5,323 American war dead of which 792 are unknowns.

 

Three Citadel Men rest in eternal peace at the cemetery which is located at Neupré, Belgium, approximately 18 kilometers south of the heart of Liège.

Frank Elmer Grogan, Jr., Class of 1942

Jerome Chris Serros, Class of 1942

James William Hendon, Jr. Class of 1942

/RL


Honoring the Citadel Men at Manila American Cemetery


Manila American Cemetery

By Matt Lacina, ‘89, guest author

Last summer, my family and I visited the Philippines. Seeing and enjoying The Citadel Memorial Europe’s website made me think of those who fell in the Pacific Theater so before going I planned and prepared an expedition to the Manila American Cemetery and Memorial. I learned that there are 34 Citadel Men among the 17,201 men and women buried there and 36,285 memorialized on the Tablets of the Missing. Garrett Jackson, ‘01, shared with me a lot of helpful information about these alumni, and I became determined to pay my respects. At the cemetery, we spent the good part of a day seeking out the names and graves of Citadel Men, and finding the names of members of my wife’s family on the Tablets of the Missing.

Click here for a full overview of the 34 Citadel Men at Manila American Cemetery

Overwhelming in beauty, size, and history…
The Manila cemetery contains the largest number of graves of our WWII military dead. After the War, the Philippine government donated land that was formerly part of (more…)


Citadel Men, Margraten Boys and a Debt of Honor

by Steven V. Smith, ’84 – Chair, CAA History Committee

This article originally appeared in the Alumni News of The Citadel – Summer/Fall 2013. It is reprinted here in its entirety with the permission of the Citadel Alumni Association. Several photos have been added to this web post which did not appear in the original print version. The original article may be downloaded here.

In early 1949 a package arrived at the Kenilworth building, Alden Park Manor, Philadelphia addressed to Mr. Samuel W. Rolph. The package contained the flag which covered the casket of his son, Staff Sgt. Robert C. Rolph, killed in action near Hottorf, Germany, Feb. 25, 1945, during the Rhineland campaign. The flag was a tangible reminder of his and his wife’s decision to have their son’s remains permanently interred in one of the newly established World War II cemeteries in Europe rather than returned for burial in the United States. Mrs. Rolph had recently sent a photograph of her son in uniform to The Citadel in response to General Summerall’s request to display it with other Citadel World War II dead on the memorial gallery wall in the library in Bond Hall.

Netherlands American Cemetery

The Netherlands American Cemetery is the only American Military Cemetery in Holland. It contains the final resting place of 8,301 servicemen and women with an additional 1,722 names listed on the Walls of the Missing. There are 40 instances where two brothers are buried side by side. Of the 16 WWI and WWII cemeteries in Europe, the cemetery at Margraten holds the largest number of Citadel alumni. In addition to Robert C. Rolph, ’46, seven other Citadel alumni are buried here and all have been adopted and remembered by grateful Dutch citizens.

Rolph_Sphinx_1943_p161

R. C. Rolph, ’46. 1943 Sphinx.

At the end of the summer 1942, Robert C. Rolph entered The Citadel with the Class of 1946. After a year at The Citadel, he, like many other cadets and college students, found himself drafted for the war effort. Rolph was initially assigned to Battery C, 2nd Antiaircraft Training Battalion at Fort Eustis, Virginia. Selected in October 1943 for assignment with the Army Specialized Training Program, he was assigned to Section 6 Company A 2517th Service Unit (AST), Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. where he studied engineering. However, the urgent need for infantry replacements meant the sacrifice of the AST program and Rolph, like many thousands of others, ended up as a private in the infantry. He was assigned to L Company 3d Battalion, 406th Infantry Regiment, 102d Infantry Division. (more…)


A beautiful sad place…

IMG_4365

By Maurice Heemels

On Sunday May 26, 2013, the soldiers resting in the American cemetery in The Netherlands were remembered and honored by American and Dutch authorities, American family and descendants, Dutch who adopted their graves, and all others interested in the efforts made by young American men to liberate Europe from inhumanity and totalitarianism.

Wet, white marble, flowers and flags made the cemetery on a cold Sunday in May a ‘beautiful sad place’. Sad because of its mere existence, beautiful because of its structure, its many details, the care which has been spent to keep the memory of those who fell alive, and, last but not least, its peacefulness. A peacefulness that contrasts painfully with the cold facts of World War Two’s last months of harsh fighting – fighting on French, Belgian, Dutch, and, in particular, German soil. Evil could not be overcome easily…

In all the speeches held on Margraten‘s Memorial Day one fact was remembered several times – the fact that the young Americans who found their last resting place in the Dutch countryside gave their lives for the freedom of people they did not know, living in a part of the world they had never been and knew almost nothing about.

For people of my generation, and I believe for the majority of young people today, it is quite unimaginable to get killed while helping other people in a different part of the world. Why should anyone do such a thing? Why leave your loved ones, your hometown and your country on a risky, maybe deadly trip to a war region? (more…)


“Sad Message Reaches Parents”

W.S. Covington, Jr. [Class of 1946] Missing In Action

Sad Message That Prominent Young College Student Was Missing Reaches Parents;
Was In Infantry Doing Heavy Fighting

A message was received here yesterday by Mr. And Mrs. Walter S. Covington from the War Department at Washington that their son, Walter S. Covington, Jr., had been missing in action in the European theater of war since December 9. The Adjutant General’s office assured the parents that they would be kept informed of any other details which might be learned.

covington_1946_henri-chapellePvt. Covington, 19, was in the Infantry, and is believed to have been with the First Army. The last letter received from him by his family was written about the middle of November from Luxembourg, but it is not known, of course, where he was when he became missing. The message leaves his family in a state of doubt and bewilderment. They hope that he was taken prisoner, or was merely lost from his outfit; but the haunting fear that he may have fallen fighting the foe still besets their troubled hearts. (more…)


One Year of The Citadel Memorial Europe

WE REMEMBER…

One year ago, I published I wear the ring and publicly announced the availability of this digital memorial to the Citadel Men interred and memorialized here in 16 military cemeteries across Europe and North Africa.

It has been a year of vibrant impressions and one of the most spiritually and emotionally enriching years of my life. As I have tried to get to know these men and to share their stories, I have had the pleasure of making many new friends, and reconnecting with old friends, here in Europe and in America. So many warm and incredible people have touched my life this year. For this, I am truly grateful.

I have compiled my Top Ten Memories. Here is our story as I experienced it the past 12 months…

– Into Thy Hands O Lord –

1 Visit to Cambridge with BillA few days after “going public”, I received an email from an alumnus. A few weeks later, I flew over the North Sea to visit Cambridge American Cemetery in England with him, two of his sons, and the historian of “The Bloody 100th”. It was an inspirational and moving experience that I shall never forget. Together, we paid our respects to the three Citadel Men resting in peace and the one memorialized on the Wall of the Missing. Together, we recited The Cadet Prayer.

On that day, I began a new phase in this journey. See my post The Major of St. Lo.

– Memorial Day –

During Memorial Day weekend, I visited the Citadel Men resting in peace at the Netherlands and Henri-Chapelle American Cemeteries. The two cemeteries are located just 20 kilometers from each other, one on either side of the Dutch-Belgian border to the east of Maastricht and Liege in the direction of Aachen, Germany.

An alumnus wrote to me several times during April and May, “Don’t forget those who are still Missing-In-Action!”. In remembrance of the eight men who rest in no known grave here in Europe and North Africa, I laid flowers at the grave of an unknown a few meters from Albert S. Hagood, Class of 1931. They are not forgotten.

Two posts – Part I and Part II – describe the events of that spectacular Memorial Day weekend.

Memorial Day - Copy

– Faces and Stories –

Since last April, I have received details about our men from many places – alumni, family, their “adopters”, historians, and archivists. Four men have received the attention of several posts. Their names, faces, and stories have become familiar. (more…)


The Great War 1914 – 1918

1Lt. J.H. David, Jr., ’14 [2]

Last week, in memoriam pages were created for the three Citadel Men who died fighting in France during World War I and who now rest there…
1LT JOHN HODGES DAVID, JR., Class of 1914
LT WILLIAM MONTAGUE NICHOLLS, Class of 1912
1LT WILLIAM ALLSBROOK MULLOY, Class of 1909

With their inclusion, The Citadel Memorial Europe website contains records for all the 50 Citadel Men interred or memorialized in 15 American Cemeteries in Europe and North Africa and the one Citadel Man memorialized at a British Commonwealth Cemetery.

During World War I, 316 Citadel graduates and an undetermined number of alumni served in Europe. The entire Citadel Class’s of 1917 and 1918 eventually served in the armed forces. Nine Citadel Alumni are known to have sacrificed their lives to hostile or accidental friendly fire on the battlefield.[1] A brief history of The Citadel during WWI is available here.

Photo courtesy Steve Smith, ’84

Born on Christmas Day 1892, 1Lt. David, a native of Dillon, S.C., was the first South Carolina officer, and the first Citadel graduate, to be killed in action with the American forces in France on March 1, 1918. He was 25 years old and in the 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division. He rests in peace in St. Mihiel American Cemetery located 29 miles south of Verdun, France. The WWI cemetery has 4,153 graves of which 117 are “Unknowns”. Another 284 Americans are memorialized on Tablets of the Missing.

(more…)


Memorial Day Weekend 2012 in Belgium and The Netherlands – Part II

Back to Part I – Henri-Chapelle
__________

“Oos Heim” Margraten

Having made the trip from Henri-Chapelle, Belgium to Margraten, The Netherlands in a very relaxed 25 minutes – the weather and scenery were so utterly beautiful. It was one of those days where you could just not help but smile and thank God you are alive – I stopped the car at “Oos Heim” (local dialect meaning “Our Home”), Margraten’s community center and walked inside. Margraten, itself, dates from the 13th century and is a small village sitting on top an ancient plateau surrounded by lush farmland, apple orchards, and wooded areas. It has a population of a few thousand, and the American cemetery is the final resting place for 8,301 G.I.s. Sixty-eight years ago on 13 September 1944 when it was liberated from the Nazis, the population was only several hundred, and in 1946, at its largest, the cemetery contained almost 20,000 graves.

(more…)


Memorial Day 2012 – ABMC Event Schedule

Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, August 2011

The American Battle Monuments Commission has published a schedule for the Memorial Day 2012 events at all of the overseas cemeteries on its Facebook page. Click here for the ABMC Facebook events page.

I found their FB page today, and I immediately hit “Like”. It is beautiful and very respectfully done. There are lots of high-resolution and detailed photos of the monuments and cemeteries, and more are being added every day. They also remember a service member each day with a photo of his or her gravemarker and information resulting in interesting comments being posted by relatives and friends.

We were already planning on attending the Memorial Day ceremony at the Netherlands American Cemetery. This takes place on Sunday, May 27 at 15:00. Now that the full schedule is known, we may also try to attend the ceremonies at Ardennes and Henri-Chapelle. The ceremonies will be held on Saturday, May 26 at 10:00 and 16:00 respectively. As plans for cemetery visits become firm, we will add them to our Agenda page.

At the Netherlands American Cemetery are 8 Citadel Men, Ardennes 2 Citadel Men, and Henri-Chapelle 5 Citadel Men. Click here for the list of Citadel Men at each cemetery.

/RL