We shall not forget

Posts tagged “Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery

Edwin Browning Moore, Class of 1944

E.B. Moore was born on September 19, 1923 in Manila, Philippine Islands. His father, William C. Moore, Class of 1915, was a career Army officer, and the family moved many times in Edwin’s early years. Records show a few of their many residences included Gainesville, FL (1930), where his father was a military instructor at the University of Florida; Fort Davis, Panama Canal (1935); and Charleston, SC, (1938-1940 where his father was a military instructor at The Citadel. Edwin’s parents were married in 1918 in Columbus, Georgia. His mother, Dorothy Rodgers Moore, was from Charleston.

1943-sphinx-moore-eb-44Cadet Sergeant Edwin Browning Moore, Class of 1944

Edwin’s father, Maj. William Cheney Moore, USA, was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel while at The Citadel. He was an Associate Professor of Military Science and Tactics and headed the Infantry Unit during the 1939-40 academic year. Working with him were two of his Citadel classmates, Maj. Robert Kirk, USA, and Maj. Roy Hilton. The 1940 Sphinx recorded, “Because they are alumni of The Citadel, they are able to assist cadets in coping with the various problems (more…)


Waverly Owen Skidmore, Class of 1946

Owen Skidmore was born on September 24, 1923, to Mattie Owen and Lloyd J. Skidmore of Albemarle, North Carolina. After graduating from Albemarle High School in June, 1942, he entered The Citadel with the Class of 1946 at the beginning of the academic year 1942-43. In the South Carolina Corps of Cadets, he was a member of Cadet Company K during this Freshman, and only, year at The Citadel. At the end of the first semester, he registered for the draft. His draft card, completed December 24, 1942, listed him as 5’7”, 132 lbs, brown hair and eyes, with a “ruddy” complexion. He would be inducted into the Army at Fort Bragg, N.C., on August 12, 1943.
Waverly O Skidmore 1946

Private Owen Skidmore wrote his parents, in a letter they received August 2, 1944, that he was wounded on July 26, receiving chest and head wounds, and was (more…)


Joseph Barre Traywick, Class of 1931

Born on August 31, 1910, to Mrs. Janie Crute Traywick and Dr. A.P. Traywick, Joseph was a native of Cameron, South Carolina. He attended The Citadel and was graduated from the Medical College of South Carolina in Charleston. While at The Citadel, he majored in Chemistry and was a Cadet Private in Cadet Companies F and D his freshman and junior years respectively.

Joseph Barre Traywick Sphinx 1930Cadet Private Joseph Barre Traywick
Class of 1931

In the summer of 1930, Cadet Traywick spent six weeks studying at the Chemical Warfare Training Camp at Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland, and upon completion was commissioned a second lieutenant, officer reserve corps, chemical warfare service.

He served his medical internship at Roper hospital in Charleston. Dr. Traywick was resident physician for the Santee-Cooper project at (more…)


Robert Alexander Bates, Class of 1945

Robert Bates was a native of Park Ridge, Illinois, born on September 9, 1923 to Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Bates. In 1941, he graduated from Maine High School and entered The Citadel at the beginning of the academic year 1941-1942. During his studies in Charleston, he was a member of Cadet Company C .[1][2][3]

Robert Alexander Bates

In July 1943, after completing his sophomore year, he enlisted in the U.S. Army.  He received his training in California and Colorado before reporting for duty overseas. In Europe, he served with the Military Police (MP) Platoon, Headquarters Company, (more…)


More than a name in marble

Originally written and published in Dutch in the Limburg’s local newspaper on March 26, 2015.
Link naar artikel in het nederlands. Translation by W. Kiggen and M. Heemels.


AT THE NEIGHBORS [1]
The Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery was yesterday dominated by the Citadel Men. Guys who were plucked from the school to fight in World War II.

by Stefan Gillissen

US military training is best known for the big screen. Movies paint a gruesome picture of the first weeks in the service of Uncle Sam, with Full Metal Jacket and Jarhead as stand outs. Breaking the will, the decompensation of the mind, creates the perfect fighting machine. It is not necessarily an incorrect observation, but one without qualification. Training is needed to forge a unit that follows commands in wartime.

Citadel Cadet plays Amazing Grace at Henri-Chapelle American CemeteryA Citadel cadet plays for the fallen men. Photo Arnaud Nilwik

But not only in the army do candidates undergo Bootcamp or what is called Hell Week. Also at American military academies, cadets are subject to a heavy introduction. From there, at least 40 percent of the men and women will go into active military service in 2015, and they are a showcase for the country. Formed by brutal workout, driven by honor and love. (more…)


“Sad Message Reaches Parents”

W.S. Covington, Jr. [Class of 1946] Missing In Action

Sad Message That Prominent Young College Student Was Missing Reaches Parents;
Was In Infantry Doing Heavy Fighting

A message was received here yesterday by Mr. And Mrs. Walter S. Covington from the War Department at Washington that their son, Walter S. Covington, Jr., had been missing in action in the European theater of war since December 9. The Adjutant General’s office assured the parents that they would be kept informed of any other details which might be learned.

covington_1946_henri-chapellePvt. Covington, 19, was in the Infantry, and is believed to have been with the First Army. The last letter received from him by his family was written about the middle of November from Luxembourg, but it is not known, of course, where he was when he became missing. The message leaves his family in a state of doubt and bewilderment. They hope that he was taken prisoner, or was merely lost from his outfit; but the haunting fear that he may have fallen fighting the foe still besets their troubled hearts. (more…)


One Year of The Citadel Memorial Europe

WE REMEMBER…

One year ago, I published I wear the ring and publicly announced the availability of this digital memorial to the Citadel Men interred and memorialized here in 16 military cemeteries across Europe and North Africa.

It has been a year of vibrant impressions and one of the most spiritually and emotionally enriching years of my life. As I have tried to get to know these men and to share their stories, I have had the pleasure of making many new friends, and reconnecting with old friends, here in Europe and in America. So many warm and incredible people have touched my life this year. For this, I am truly grateful.

I have compiled my Top Ten Memories. Here is our story as I experienced it the past 12 months…

– Into Thy Hands O Lord –

1 Visit to Cambridge with BillA few days after “going public”, I received an email from an alumnus. A few weeks later, I flew over the North Sea to visit Cambridge American Cemetery in England with him, two of his sons, and the historian of “The Bloody 100th”. It was an inspirational and moving experience that I shall never forget. Together, we paid our respects to the three Citadel Men resting in peace and the one memorialized on the Wall of the Missing. Together, we recited The Cadet Prayer.

On that day, I began a new phase in this journey. See my post The Major of St. Lo.

– Memorial Day –

During Memorial Day weekend, I visited the Citadel Men resting in peace at the Netherlands and Henri-Chapelle American Cemeteries. The two cemeteries are located just 20 kilometers from each other, one on either side of the Dutch-Belgian border to the east of Maastricht and Liege in the direction of Aachen, Germany.

An alumnus wrote to me several times during April and May, “Don’t forget those who are still Missing-In-Action!”. In remembrance of the eight men who rest in no known grave here in Europe and North Africa, I laid flowers at the grave of an unknown a few meters from Albert S. Hagood, Class of 1931. They are not forgotten.

Two posts – Part I and Part II – describe the events of that spectacular Memorial Day weekend.

Memorial Day - Copy

– Faces and Stories –

Since last April, I have received details about our men from many places – alumni, family, their “adopters”, historians, and archivists. Four men have received the attention of several posts. Their names, faces, and stories have become familiar. (more…)