We shall not forget

Posts tagged “South Carolina Corps of Cadets

The story of ‘The Class that Never Was’ now in four languages across Europe

This article was originally published by The Citadel Newsroom on November 6, 2014.

CHARLESTON, SC – In honor of the 70th Anniversary of The Citadel’s Class of 1944, known as “The Class that Never Was”, and in memory of the members of the classmates who served in or were killed in action in World War II, the college released a special video presentation in 2014 just before D-Day.

Citadel Cadets 1942

Cadets consider enlisting with the Navy, 1942

Now, that video, which includes rare film footage from campus in the 1940s, is being shown in four languages throughout Europe, thanks to the work of Roger Long who is a member of The Citadel Class of 1989, and members of The Citadel Memorial Europe Foundation. Long is president of the BENELUX Citadel Club, and founder and chairman of The Citadel Memorial Europe Foundation. He lives in Heythuysen, in the Dutch province of Limburg. He is originally from Raleigh, N.C.

“Members of The Citadel Memorial Europe Foundation volunteer in middle schools around the continent. The video about The Class that Never Was is the perfect teaching tool we needed to help honors and memorialize the Citadel men and their allies who died while in the service of their country here in Europe and in North Africa,” Long said.

Long worked with translators to establish subtitled copies of the video in DutchFrench and Italian, to complement the original version in English, enabling Europeans speaking those languages to view the video. (more…)


Charles Alister Witsell, Jr., Class of 1946

Born on April 21, 1924, in Colleton County, South Carolina, to Pauline and Charles Alister Witsell, Charles, Jr., grew up on Hampton Street in Walterboro. He attended the public schools of Walterboro. After graduating from Walterboro High School in 1941, he attended the Porter Military Academy for one year before entering The Citadel at the beginning of the 1942-43 academic year with the Class of 1946. He was a Cadet Private Fourth Class in Company M of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

Charles enlisted in the service on July 30, 1943 at Fort Jackson. Originally volunteering for the Army Air Corps, he was rejected because of defective vision. In August, 1943, he volunteered for infantry service, and received his basic training at Anniston, Alabama. He was sent overseas, first to Africa, then to the Anzio beachhead. He served overseas for several months (more…)


LIFE AT THE CITADEL

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, May 31, 1942, p.43


This is another in a series of articles on Life on the Campus at our leading schools and colleges. By ELEANOR NANGLE

FOR THE last week more than 200 first classmen at the Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina at Charleston, have been approaching, with a reluctance they wouldn’t have believed possible four years ago, the most eagerly anticipated event of their lives. As seniors they have led the corps for the last time. They have formed in the reviewing stand to receive the last parade. Yesterday they were graduated.

Today they are scattering to their homes in all parts of the country, most of them pausing only briefly before they enter the armed services. But something of them remains at the Citadel, adding in large or small measure to the vast stores of cadet tales and traditions there. And the spirit of the Citadel goes with them. In the life of all Citadel men the thread of Citadel memories is one of the most colorful, durable, and treasured in its whole tapestry.

Full-dress parade in the Spring of 1943 (Courtesy of The Citadel Archives)

The Citadel man has absorbed more than rigorous training of mind, body, and spirit, and when he reviews them, as all graduating cadets do on commencement day, he places new value on other gifts of the school to the student – the Spartan discipline, the good counsel, the friendships, the democracy, the pageantry of patriotism and the essence of it. (more…)


The Citadel Museum Reopens

Daniel Library Director, David Goble, ’69, talks about the much anticipated re-opening of The Citadel Museum, which represents the history of The Citadel from it’s founding in 1842 to the present. This exhibit explores the long history of the school by showcasing some of our past and present uniforms displayed along a timeline. A display of The Citadel rings from 1895 to the present is also a focal point of the museum.


Look for other topical displays throughout the Daniel Library. Through a self guided tour, the visitor experiences the essence of each era in The Citadel’s history. (more…)


Pat Conroy, the Lowcountry’s Prince of Tides, passes away

Excerpts from the like titled article written by Brian Hicks and published by Post & Courier, Charleston, South Carolina, March 4, 2016. FULL ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE


Pat Conroy, the best-selling novelist and proud adoptive son of the Lowcountry who wrote lyrically about Charleston and unflinchingly about The Citadel, died Friday. He was 70.

Pat Conroy - Citadel AthleticsCadet Pat Conroy, Class of 1967
Source: The Citadel Athletics

The author of “The Great Santini,” “The Lords of Discipline” and “The Prince of Tides” and eight other books passed away shortly after being diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer that had gone undetected. He died at 7:43 p.m., surrounded by loved ones and family.

The Citadel mourned his passing Friday night.

“This is a very sad day for The Citadel family. Pat Conroy was a world-renowned author, active in his community and a passionate alumnus of The Citadel. He will be missed,” Lt. Gen. John Rosa, Citadel President said.

He wore The Ring (more…)


“America’s Band” in 2015: The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes Invited Back to Tattoo in Scotland to Represent the US

In 2015, The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes will proudly represent the United States at the world’s largest musical event of its kind, the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo in Scotland.


(PRWEB) August 05, 2014
The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo

The only United States military college band to ever be invited to the exclusive Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo will be headed back to Edinburgh, Scotland, in July of 2015, with the help of supporters. The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes will again be the only U.S. band appearing on the medieval castle esplanade for the month-long festival of music, pageantry and demonstrations by military organizations from around the world. The program is broadcast in 30 countries to approximately 100 million people annually, according to the BBC.

“The links between Scotland and the Carolinas are well-founded and well-documented. So, on their return to Tattoo, the Regimental Band and Pipes of The Citadel will open with one of the great Scottish pipe tunes, from one citadel to another…as the stars and stripes fly high for America’s Band,” said BBC presenter Iain Anderson during the 2010 Tattoo.

The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is working to raise the funds needed to send 80 band members, and all the necessary equipment back to the prestigious event for the third time. The college represented the U.S. after receiving the coveted invitation to the international festival, the largest of its kind in the world, in 1991 and then again in 2010. The Citadel was the first military college invited to Edinburgh (pronounced Ed-in-bur-uh) and is the only military college ever invited since.

The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes (more…)


No greater devotion to or love for our Alma Mater…

Class of 1931_from 1930 Sphinx

The Citadel’s Class of 1931 [1]

“We, the members of the Junior class, are extremely proud and grateful of the honor of being an important part of The Citadel. Perhaps greater classes have gone before us, but we doubt if any can show a greater devotion to and love for our Alma Mater.

Ours was the largest Freshman class ever to enroll at The Citadel, and the surviving Juniors of the hard grind of two years represent a small part of our classmates who first matriculated. Some have fallen by the wayside; others have battled heroically to attain the qualifications of a Junior in scholarship, military advancement, and moral leadership. Our path has been hindered by obstacles; but overcoming them, we have increased our momentum and have set our eyes on the goal of graduation next year.

Experience in various lines of duty has been acquired throughout our Freshman and Sophomore years. Realizing that vanity, arrogance, and boastfulness are detrimental to advancement, we hope and believe those factors have been removed in our first years here. Still we are conscious of imperfections in ourselves, our class, our school. An imperative duty thus faces us — to give our best for progress. We are determined not to be found wanting in that respect.

Ours is not a conservative class; neither is it radical. Our representatives have possibly been (more…)