We shall not forget

Posts tagged “South Carolina

LIFE AT THE CITADEL

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, May 31, 1942, p.43


This is another in a series of articles on Life on the Campus at our leading schools and colleges. By ELEANOR NANGLE

FOR THE last week more than 200 first classmen at the Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina at Charleston, have been approaching, with a reluctance they wouldn’t have believed possible four years ago, the most eagerly anticipated event of their lives. As seniors they have led the corps for the last time. They have formed in the reviewing stand to receive the last parade. Yesterday they were graduated.

Today they are scattering to their homes in all parts of the country, most of them pausing only briefly before they enter the armed services. But something of them remains at the Citadel, adding in large or small measure to the vast stores of cadet tales and traditions there. And the spirit of the Citadel goes with them. In the life of all Citadel men the thread of Citadel memories is one of the most colorful, durable, and treasured in its whole tapestry.

Full-dress parade in the Spring of 1943 (Courtesy of The Citadel Archives)

The Citadel man has absorbed more than rigorous training of mind, body, and spirit, and when he reviews them, as all graduating cadets do on commencement day, he places new value on other gifts of the school to the student – the Spartan discipline, the good counsel, the friendships, the democracy, the pageantry of patriotism and the essence of it. (more…)


Perry Moses Phelps, ’29

Perry M. Phelps was born in North Carolina to Rosalie Virginia Moses and Aaron Cohen Phelps on April 22, 1909. He was a member of the Class of 1929, graduating from The Citadel in Charleston, SC, with a Bachelors degree in Business Administration. He was a member of Cadet Company “E” when this photograph was made for the 1928 Sphinx, the yearbook of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

Cadet Private Perry Moses Phelps, Class of 1929

Following graduation from The Citadel, Perry Phelps became a well-known citizen of Sumter, South Carolina where he was associated with (more…)


The Citadel Museum Reopens

Daniel Library Director, David Goble, ’69, talks about the much anticipated re-opening of The Citadel Museum, which represents the history of The Citadel from it’s founding in 1842 to the present. This exhibit explores the long history of the school by showcasing some of our past and present uniforms displayed along a timeline. A display of The Citadel rings from 1895 to the present is also a focal point of the museum.


Look for other topical displays throughout the Daniel Library. Through a self guided tour, the visitor experiences the essence of each era in The Citadel’s history. (more…)


Pat Conroy, the Lowcountry’s Prince of Tides, passes away

Excerpts from the like titled article written by Brian Hicks and published by Post & Courier, Charleston, South Carolina, March 4, 2016. FULL ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE


Pat Conroy, the best-selling novelist and proud adoptive son of the Lowcountry who wrote lyrically about Charleston and unflinchingly about The Citadel, died Friday. He was 70.

Pat Conroy - Citadel AthleticsCadet Pat Conroy, Class of 1967
Source: The Citadel Athletics

The author of “The Great Santini,” “The Lords of Discipline” and “The Prince of Tides” and eight other books passed away shortly after being diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer that had gone undetected. He died at 7:43 p.m., surrounded by loved ones and family.

The Citadel mourned his passing Friday night.

“This is a very sad day for The Citadel family. Pat Conroy was a world-renowned author, active in his community and a passionate alumnus of The Citadel. He will be missed,” Lt. Gen. John Rosa, Citadel President said.

He wore The Ring (more…)


Martin Frederick Schnibben, Jr., ’43

Born on February 4, 1922, to Mrs. Leah Martha Stooks Schnibben and Mr. Martin Frederick Schnibben, in Florence, South Carolina, Martin F. “Jack” Schnibben, Jr., attended the Florence city schools and graduated from Riverside Military Academy of Gainesville, Georgia and Hollywood, Florida.

40146_b085391-00130_Schnibben senior page 127 1943 Sphinx croppedCadet Second Lieutenant Martin Frederick “Jack” Schnibben, Class of 1943
Source: 1943 Sphinx, the yearbook of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

He entered The Citadel at Charleston, South Carolina in 1939 where he was a member of Cadet Company “B” his freshman year, “C” his sophomore year, and “A” his junior and senior years. He played on the football team his first two years, and was a member of the International Relations Club his final two years at the college. During his senior year (more…)


Experience of POW Lt. Richard H. Kellahan

By Richard H. Kellahan, Class of 1944

Posted here with the permission of the Kellahan family. Originally written for the Oflag 64 Association (website).


Our entire class of 1944 left the Citadel at the end of our junior year in 1943. Infantry cadets went to Ft. McClellan, Alabama, for 17 weeks of basic training with other ROTC students from various schools. Upon completion of basic training we returned briefly to the Citadel for the Advanced Student Training Program while awaiting the beginning of a new class at Officer Candidate School where we would be commissioned as 2nd Lieutenants upon completion of the 17-week course. We graduated from OCS in May of 1944 and joined the 84th Infantry Division at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, for the final stage of training before we were shipped to England and Europe for the final push into Germany.

Richard H. Kellahan, Class of 1944Richard H. Kellahan, Class of 1944
Cadet Platoon Sergeant, “C” Company

1943 Sphinx

We arrived in Germany in October 1944. The Allies were bogged down at that time in the mud and bad weather of late October and early November at the Siegfried Line, Germany’s heavily armed line of defense that was about 5 miles deep and ran from the Baltic Sea to the Alps. It was filled with pillboxes, anti-tank equipment, and every other kind of defense imaginable. Any advance by our troops was measured in yards.

My Citadel classmate Creswell Garlington and I led two platoons from [“I” Company] 3rd Battalion of the 335th Regiment on the morning of November 29, 1944, for a daylight attack on a small village called (more…)


Joseph Andrews, ’40

Born on July 23, 1918 in Orangeburg, South Carolina, to Mr. and Mrs. Burt Williams Andrews, Joseph grew up in Washington, D.C. where his father, an 1898 graduate of The Citadel, was working as a lawyer for the U.S. Government.

Joseph Andrews 1940 SphinxCadet 1st Lieutenant Joseph Andrews, Class of 1940

“After spending a year at George Washington University, Joe come [sic] to The Citadel and made good from the very beginning. He had the ability to come straight to the point in conversations and was always sincere in his convictions. Through his friendliness he acquired many friends in the Corps of Cadets and has added much to the Glee Club during his three years here. During his Senior year Joe was very active in radio work, and he was announcer for The Citadel programs. His one ambition is to be a good doctor, at the top of the medical profession.” [1]

(more…)