We shall not forget

Posts tagged “WWI

LIFE AT THE CITADEL

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, May 31, 1942, p.43


This is another in a series of articles on Life on the Campus at our leading schools and colleges. By ELEANOR NANGLE

FOR THE last week more than 200 first classmen at the Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina at Charleston, have been approaching, with a reluctance they wouldn’t have believed possible four years ago, the most eagerly anticipated event of their lives. As seniors they have led the corps for the last time. They have formed in the reviewing stand to receive the last parade. Yesterday they were graduated.

Today they are scattering to their homes in all parts of the country, most of them pausing only briefly before they enter the armed services. But something of them remains at the Citadel, adding in large or small measure to the vast stores of cadet tales and traditions there. And the spirit of the Citadel goes with them. In the life of all Citadel men the thread of Citadel memories is one of the most colorful, durable, and treasured in its whole tapestry.

Full-dress parade in the Spring of 1943 (Courtesy of The Citadel Archives)

The Citadel man has absorbed more than rigorous training of mind, body, and spirit, and when he reviews them, as all graduating cadets do on commencement day, he places new value on other gifts of the school to the student – the Spartan discipline, the good counsel, the friendships, the democracy, the pageantry of patriotism and the essence of it. (more…)


Army ROTC at The Citadel celebrates 100 years

citadel coastal artillery cadets drilling circa 1923Citadel Coastal Artillery Corps ROTC cadets with 8 inch Howitzer M1918 MkVIII, circa 1923


Originally published by The Citadel, October 20, 2016, on thedigitel.com


The Citadel marks its Army ROTC Centennial on Oct.  21, 2016

By Maj. Steve Smith, TAC officer and Citadel historian

The Citadel applied to the U.S. Department of War in 1882, requesting that an Army officer be assigned to the college as Professor of Military Science and Tactics. That application laid the groundwork for what would eventually become an Army ROTC program at the college. (Photo: Citadel CAC ROTC cadets drilling Howitzer M1918 MkVIII, circa 1923)

In the coming years, The Citadel was classified as an Essentially Military College — meaning students were housed in barracks, constantly in uniform, and bound to a disciplinary system. As a result, the war department’s college division inspected The Citadel annually from 1904-27, during which time the college earned the distinguished college title 20 times until the program was suspended. In 1916 and 1917, the designation allowed The Citadel to recommend (more…)


Capt. Holmes Dies in France

Originally published in The News & Courier, Charleston, South Carolina, Sunday, July 28, 1918.


Charleston was much saddened yesterday to learn through The News and Courier of the death in France of Capt. James H. Holmes, Jr., of Charleston, and Capt. Julius A. Mood of Summerton. Capt. Holmes’ wife and little baby, whom he has never seen, are in Hendersonville, N.C., with his parents. His widow was Miss Adela Follin, of Charleston.

James Hill Holmes, Class of 1915JAMES HILL HOLMES, JR.
CLASS OF 1915
October 9, 1895 – July 19, 1918

Capt. Holmes graduated at the Citadel in the class of 1915, with the rank of senior cadet captain, the highest attainable in that splendid battalion, long recognized by the War Department as one of the most (more…)


LIEUT. JOHN H. DAVID KILLED IN FRANCE

The Dillon Herald, Dillon, South Carolina, March 14, 1918, Vol. 22, No. 18


The First to Volunteer for Foreign Service

His Death Brings Sorrow to Hundreds of Friends in State and County

Lieut. John H. David, [The Citadel Class of 1914] fighting in France, was killed in action March 1st. This announcement will bring genuine sorrow to scores of Lieut. David’s friends throughout the county and state.

J. H. David, Jr. -1Cadet Second Lieutenant John Hodges David, Jr., Class of 1914. From the 1914 Sphinx.
Photograph likely taken by Capt. Louis Knox, The Citadel.

The details of Lieut. David’s death were not given. His father Dr. J. H. David, received a telegram from the war department Monday night at 7 o’clock announcing that Lieut. David (more…)


Citadel’s first WWI casualty member of Class of 1912

From The Spartanburg Herald, Spartanburg, South Carolina, Friday Morning, October 1, 1915, Page 1…

LIEUT. NICHOLLS MEETS DEATH IN BATTLE IN FRANCE

Spartanburg Boy, Fighting Under British Flag, Killed in Action September 26th-27th.

MAY BRING REMAINS HERE FOR INTERMENT

Last Letter From Young Officer, Dated Sept. 13, Received Here Tuesday

W. Montage Nicholls, [Citadel Class of 1912] second lieutenant in the royal field artillery of the British army and a son of Mr. and Mrs. George W. Nicholls, of this city, was killed in battle the 26th or 27th of September [1915], according to a cable received yesterday morning by his father from the British war office in London.

Nicholls_luckybag1914unse_0168_portrait_only_watermarked

W. Montague Nicholls his Senior year at the US Naval Academy.

Lieutenant Nicholls had been in service with the British army for about a year. Practically all of his active service on the battle front was in France, where he was sent with his corps during February of this year. He was wounded in the fighting around Neuve-Chapelle on March 21, but was sent back to the front in France about the first of last July, since which time he had been actively engaged. While no details are known here, it is believed that he fell during the fighting in the region around Hulluch and Loos. [Battle of Loos 1915]

The cable announcing the death reads as follows:

“Deeply regret to inform you that Second Lieut. W. M. Nicholls, R. F. A., was killed in action between 26 – 27 September. Lord Kitchener expresses sympathy.”

May Bring Body Here.

Shortly after the receipt of this message, Congressman-elect Sam J. Nicholls, brother of the fallen soldier, sent a cable to the British was office asking for fuller information and asking also if arrangements might be made to have the body shipped here for interment. Friends of the family, it is understood, have also wired the United States secretary of state asking assistance in this undertaking. (more…)


One Year of The Citadel Memorial Europe

WE REMEMBER…

One year ago, I published I wear the ring and publicly announced the availability of this digital memorial to the Citadel Men interred and memorialized here in 16 military cemeteries across Europe and North Africa.

It has been a year of vibrant impressions and one of the most spiritually and emotionally enriching years of my life. As I have tried to get to know these men and to share their stories, I have had the pleasure of making many new friends, and reconnecting with old friends, here in Europe and in America. So many warm and incredible people have touched my life this year. For this, I am truly grateful.

I have compiled my Top Ten Memories. Here is our story as I experienced it the past 12 months…

– Into Thy Hands O Lord –

1 Visit to Cambridge with BillA few days after “going public”, I received an email from an alumnus. A few weeks later, I flew over the North Sea to visit Cambridge American Cemetery in England with him, two of his sons, and the historian of “The Bloody 100th”. It was an inspirational and moving experience that I shall never forget. Together, we paid our respects to the three Citadel Men resting in peace and the one memorialized on the Wall of the Missing. Together, we recited The Cadet Prayer.

On that day, I began a new phase in this journey. See my post The Major of St. Lo.

– Memorial Day –

During Memorial Day weekend, I visited the Citadel Men resting in peace at the Netherlands and Henri-Chapelle American Cemeteries. The two cemeteries are located just 20 kilometers from each other, one on either side of the Dutch-Belgian border to the east of Maastricht and Liege in the direction of Aachen, Germany.

An alumnus wrote to me several times during April and May, “Don’t forget those who are still Missing-In-Action!”. In remembrance of the eight men who rest in no known grave here in Europe and North Africa, I laid flowers at the grave of an unknown a few meters from Albert S. Hagood, Class of 1931. They are not forgotten.

Two posts – Part I and Part II – describe the events of that spectacular Memorial Day weekend.

Memorial Day - Copy

– Faces and Stories –

Since last April, I have received details about our men from many places – alumni, family, their “adopters”, historians, and archivists. Four men have received the attention of several posts. Their names, faces, and stories have become familiar. (more…)


A Face and Story with Every Name…

In my previous post, I lamented how I had not yet found a picture or portrait clearly identifying
2Lt. William Montague Nicholls, Class of 1912. This was truly frustrating me and causing me many sleepless nights.

I want there to be a face for every Citadel Man interred or memorialized in the military cemeteries of Europe and North Africa, and I want their stories to be told. All the headstones and memorials are beautiful, but they are cold, hard, identical, and overwhelming in numbers. With a photo, each name chiseled into marble, becomes a man, flesh and blood, each with his own unique character and story.

Looking into the faces of these men, I often find myself asking, “God, why did you take him?” “He was too young.” “He was a father.” “He was an only son.” “He was a brother.” By seeking out and pulling together their stories, I am learning of their deeds and their nicknames. I am coming to know them in a personal way, and I shall remember them.

Thus, I persisted, driven in my search, and I am extremely pleased to say that a few days ago I located not only W. Montague Nicholls’ portrait but his entire senior write-up in the Naval Academy’s yearbook.

Nicholls_luckybag1914unse_0168

Photo source: 1914 Lucky Bag, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, p. 158. Photo courtesy of The Nimitz Library, US Naval Academy. Click on photo to enlarge.

Montague received an appointment to Annapolis during his second year at The Citadel. He was honorably discharged from the South Carolina Corps of Cadets after his sophomore year and entered the Academy with the Class of 1914 at the beginning of the 1910-1911 academic year.

(more…)